Bats of San Antonio and Texas

Review the species flashcards below, then test your knowledge with a quiz! (coming soon)

Species in San Antonio

According to available recorded data, the San Antonio area has 10 different species of bats (Davis and Schmidly, 1994) .

  • Tadarida brasiliensis - Brazilian (Mexican) Free-tailed Bat
  • Nycticeius humeralis - Evening Bat
  • Lasiurus borealis - Eastern Red Bat
  • Lasiurus intermedius - Northern Yellow Bat
  • Myotis velifer - Cave Myotis
  • Perimyotis subflavus - Tricolored Bat
  • Eptesicus fuscus - Big Brown Bat
  • Nyctinomops macrotis - Big Free-tailed Bat
  • Lasiurus cinereus - Hoary Bat
  • Lasionycteris noctivagans - Silver-haired Bat

Species in Texas

There are 33 species of bats in 4 families documented in the state of Texas. Some species are known only from a single specimen, while others are much more numerous in collections. This taxonomy follows Manning, R.W., C. Jones, and F.D. Yancey. 2008. Annotated checklist of recent land mammals of Texas, 2008. Occasional Papers, Museum of Texas Tech University 278: 1-18. Species marked with (!) are designated as Threatened by TPWD. Species marked with (!!) are designated as Endangered by TPWD.

Mormoopidae

  • Mormoops megalophylla - Ghost-faced Bat

Phyllostomatidae

  • Choeronycteris mexicana - Mexican Long-tongued Bat
  • Leptonycteris nivalis - Mexican Long-nosed Bat(!!)
  • Diphylla ecaudata - Hairy-legged Vampire

Vespertilionidae

  • Myotis austroriparius - Southeastern Myotis
  • Myotis californicus - California Myotis
  • Myotis ciliolabrum - Western Small-footed Myotis
  • Myotis occultus - Southwestern Little Brown Myotis
  • Myotis septentrionalis - Northern Long-eared Myotis
  • Myotis thysanodes - Fringed Myotis
  • Myotis velifer - Cave Myotis
  • Myotis volans - Long-legged Myotis
  • Myotis yumanensis - Yuma Myotis
  • Lasiurus blossevillii - Western Red Bat
  • Lasiurus borealis - Eastern Red Bat
  • Lasiurus cinereus - Hoary Bat
  • Lasiurus ega - Southern Yellow Bat(!)
  • Lasiurus intermedius - Northern Yellow Bat
  • Lasiurus seminolus - Seminole Bat
  • Lasiurus xanthinus - Western Yellow Bat
  • Lasionycteris noctivagans - Silver-haired Bat
  • Parastrellus hesperus - American Parastrelle
  • Perimyotis subflavus - Tricolored Bat (formerly classified as Pipistrellus subflavus and commonly Eastern Pippistrelle, American Perimyotis)
  • Eptesicus fuscus - Big Brown Bat
  • Nycticeius humeralis - Evening Bat
  • Euderma maculatum - Spotted Bat*
  • Corynorhinus rafinesquii - Rafinesque's Big-eared Bat(!)
  • Corynorhinus townsendii - Townsend's Big-eared Bat
  • Antrozous pallidus - Pallid Bat

Molossidae

  • Tadarida brasiliensis - Brazilian (Mexican) Free-tailed Bat
  • Nyctinomops femorosaccus - Pocketed Free-tailed Bat
  • Nyctinomops macrotis - Big Free-tailed Bat
  • Eumops perotis - Western Mastiff Bat

Where do bats live in Texas?

To get a quick visualization, have a look at our Bat Track map! Bats can live in caves, man-made structures like bridges and buildings, and even trees! Tree bats will roost in trunk holes, underneath peeling bark, and some bats, such as Yellow bats in particular, roost under the dead hanging fronds of palm trees! (You can use this an excuse not to trim them, but if you must trim, please choose a trimming company who is aware of this and will humanely remove or work around any bats that may be in your tree.)

Threats to Bats of Texas

Texas bats primarily have to deal with the threat of humans, feral cats, and wind turbines. However, White Nose Syndrome may become a threat in the future.

Who works with bats in Texas?

You may refer to our Bat Organization Directory to find all the wonderful organizations who have bat-related missions.